Political dynamic has emboldened business

Matt Lorenz

In many ways business is the salve of our wounded nation, a nation so split, so cut and so offended by itself that we can’t honestly and emotionally communicate with ourselves.

Even so, in business, people get up every day and they go to work. To one degree or another, they work together — interdependently. That saves us. It proves to us that we can function together as long as we do not engage in the forbidden dialogue of politics.

We have to narrow our association to business purpose even though many of us are quietly living at the extreme of political opinion.

Everyone, it seems, is waiting for a big miraculous solution to the static, stupid, staccato argument that swirls around us in the media and political institutions.

People known to be of one persuasion or another are seen through that lens. Families suffer from these ideological intrusions. Friends do, too. Who likes to walk in the garden of friendship where important but forbidden fruit bends the branches above us and litters the ground below us?

But, we work together. Businesses, once errant, are returning to our country. Jobs pay better than before. Businesses temperament has softened somewhat under reduced regulation and increased markets. The initial business response to increase was to offer higher wages and, in many cases, bonuses.

Minority unemployment and unfair treatment is the lowest it has been. With increased capacity came our national ability to show that millions of Americans have replaced the tolerance standard with the welcome standard.

Business has given so very much to America. During war it made our guns and everything else we needed to survive. In times of political strife — even stupid strife — it offers a chance for people to help each other get hand to mouth — and so much more.

Business just goes on greasing the mechanics of our society and culture. Overall, it does not complain even when it is thought of as having a greedy heart.

It has taken a businessman to disrupt and elucidate the cancerous politics this country has had for many years. Political sports watchers do not understand this nor do they understand that such disruption points the way to repair.

Business folks understand how it works. The optimism behind the technique is based on the opportunity that accompanies surviving the disruption to seize the new day, the better day. That is not a political dynamic typically; it is a business tactic. People who understand can express hope; people who do not understand can suffer within the religion of their coveted positions.

The question should not be what is President Donald Trump doing; it should be who could possibly replace him when he is gone.